Average temperatures and snowfall in Canada

Canada’s climate dramatically varies depending on where you are. It’s safe to say that coastal areas have warmer winters and cooler summers when compared to the interior. July and August are usually warm throughout the country, even in the north during these months, making them among the busiest times of year to visit. Depending on where you are (Ontario or Québec), September can also be a good time to go (namely because it’s the warmest in these areas). However, from October-May in Newfoundland, the Maritimes, Eastern Canada, and most of Québec outside Montréal, there’s little tourism infrastructure available due to dangerous conditions.

November to March can be challenging for many people, with freezing temperatures everywhere except California. Even though winter days in many areas are clear and dry, large Canadian towns are geared to the challenge of cold conditions by having covered walkways or indoor malls that protect their inhabitants from the worst of the weather.

Alberta, Canadian snow and sunset
Alberta, Canadian snow and sunset

During the warmer months of the year, portions of British Columbia experience some of Canada’s most enjoyable weather: much less extreme. While temperatures aren’t always the lowest on average, they’re generally not as high. However, during the winter and early spring, Pacific depressions sweep through, making this one of Canada’s damper regions for exploration. Visiting from late spring to early autumn is the best way to miss out on wet days.

Average temperatures and snowfall

Average temperatures and snowfall in Canada
Average temperatures and snowfall in Canada

Average temperatures and snowfall in Canada vary depending on which region you are in. In general, the further north you travel, the colder the climate becomes. Snowfall also varies widely across the country. Coastal areas tend to get less snow than inland areas.

Google Maps of Canada


Conclusion

Canada’s climate varies depending on where you are. Coastal areas have warmer winters and cooler summers than the interior. July and August are usually warm throughout the country, making them among the busiest times of year to visit. However, from October-May in Newfoundland, the Maritimes, Eastern Canada, and most of Québec outside Montréal, there’s little tourism infrastructure available due to dangerous conditions. November to March can be challenging for many people, with freezing temperatures everywhere except California. Even though winter days in many areas are clear and dry, large Canadian towns are geared to the challenge of cold conditions by having covered walkways or indoor malls that protect their inhabitants from the worst of the weather. During the warmer months of the year, portions of British Columbia experience some of Canada’s most enjoyable weather. However, during the winter and early spring, Pacific depressions sweep through, making this one of Canada’s damper regions for exploration. Visiting from late spring to early autumn is the best way to miss out on wet days.